“Input-dependent” movement

Bodies that are moving for purpose – sport, life, work, play – should be developed, encouraged, and have the capacity to move without being entirely dependent on vision or thought/concentration. One purpose of rehabilitation would be to help patients and clients move with as little dependence on these inputs, as possible and can be expected in […]

What happens on the way to learned non-use? #learnedhypouse

No matter the stimulus or breaking point, be it vestibular neuronitis leading to dependence on vision; a stroke leading to dependence on a non-dominant arm; neuropathy leading to dependence on sensory information from the hands (wall or furniture walking); or a meniscal derangement leading to asymmetrical weight bearing in gait, cuts, jumps, landing…the outcome CAN […]

Lessons learned

Recently, I was asked to reflect on my nearly 30 year career with some “lessons learned”. For what it is worth, here is what I surmised at the time of writing…. 1. Remember why you started and where you came from. This perspective is helpful to appreciate and to empathize.  2. Learning only stops when […]

How many repetitions does it take?

3 sets of 10 repetitions at 70% of 1RM (maximum capacity in one repetition)…do we wish that the “dosage” to make a change in the brain (learning) were more standardized? Fortunately or unfortunately, learning does not take a set # repetitions, time – and is rather stimulated to make a change under: Constraints (I am […]

Extroboxtion

Yes, my mind has gone neologistic again. Creating new words because: it doesn’t cost, doesn’t hurt, and makes people laugh. Why wouldn’t someone choose to do something that meets these criteria? “Extroboxtion”, to me, is a better word than innovation to describe thinking “outside the box”. I mean, why would “in”novation be the right term […]

Personality Considerations in Rehabilitation…

“If you are not reading, your not trying.” Hopefully, this is a clear word-twist reference to the oft-stated, “If you’re not cheating…you’re not trying.” phrase. My spin, for this blog, is in reference to reading personalities as an essential part of rehabilitation. Over the past nearly 30 years, I have read more personalities than books, […]

Personalities Persist

As a health care professional, I am trained to read charts and look at diagnoses. I am trained to be informed in anatomy, physiology and pathophysiologies. Over the past 30 years of my education – admittedly continuing to learn more every year – I have learned that personalilties persist. We must not only respect (emerging […]

Neuropracticity

Yes, even if you learn a new word, “neuropracticity” (the intentional application of principles leading to neuroplasticity in rehabilitation practice), you are changing your brain. How do we make neuroplasticity more tangible and less theoretical? Consider looking for opportunities to incentivize, constrain, or create avoidances – giving learners a clear pathway toward neuroplasticity – in […]

Seven Parameters of Fitness?

Strength and endurance. I was a largely unschooled, unqualified, and un-certified personal trainer for a small gym in Southwest Missouri before I entered PT school over 30 years ago. My perception and prescriptions of fitness at that time included strength and endurance. Largely, sport science and our culture defined fitness in these terms as well, […]

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  1. Parkinson Association of the Rockies – e3 conference: educate, empower, energize

    September 7 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
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    October 12 - October 19
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    November 8 @ 8:00 am - November 9 @ 5:00 pm
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    November 16

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