Personality Considerations in Rehabilitation…

“If you are not reading, your not trying.” Hopefully, this is a clear word-twist reference to the oft-stated, “If you’re not cheating…you’re not trying.” phrase. My spin, for this blog, is in reference to reading personalities as an essential part of rehabilitation. Over the past nearly 30 years, I have read more personalities than books, by far. “Who IS this person?”, has always been more important to me than, “What diagnosis does this patient have?”. Leading a person to their definition of success and to their full potential does depend on knowing their diagnosis, the pathophysiology of this condition, and the evidence that can be applied to their benefit. However, very personal considerations such as mental health (depression, anxiety), self efficacy, autonomy, past experiences, and personality traits (which I will not attempt to list all), are more than salient – these factors define how and which approaches to apply. Imagine the receptivity of your vicarious experiences as a therapist and specific predictions of short and long term success to someone with PPPD that has anxiety, is pessimistic, and is in a family dynamic with unstated secondary gain from their disability. How do you expect these predictions to be received by a patient described as such, in comparison to the receipt were the same person to be found to be optimistic? Each person is a unique individual. Clinical decision making, clinical pathways, ACO/CCO and best practice initiatives (BPIs) must allow for these variances AND acknowledge them for the greatest success of the whole.