Course Offerings 2024-2025

Please note: Many of these courses can be offered in longer and shorter versions than cited here. Several are PT, OT, SLP, or can be customized to your rehab facility, hospital, or clinic’s preferences. Additionally, several offer excellent opportunities for live patient demonstration. 

 

ITITLE: Neuropracticity: A novel and practical clinical application to induce functional improvement
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced. This course is intended for PT, OT, and SLP and is often presented as a 7 hour or 12 hour course.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will reveal a novel and intense clinical approach built specifically for persons that are 6 months or more in recovery post cerebrovascular accident (CVA); with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) after brain injury or surgery (from concussion, to TBI, to tumor) , .This approach includes Interventions that are designed and built directly from evidence and are adapted with consideration for the unique attributes of changes in the body and brain months and years after CVA/brain injury and with disease-onset for years. Additionally, this application will reveal incorporation of recent advances in motivation, motor learning, and practice – displaying all through videotape case study demonstration. Attendees will be engaged in a thought-provoking presentation that challenges previous misconceptions about the timeline of recovery and potential for improvement years after CVA and the potential to recover with MS, PD, concussion in the elderly, etc. This presentation builds on recent evidence of high-intensity interval training, procedural memory training, circuit training, task specific overtraining, motor learning, OPTIMAL, forced-use and many more – across mobility, communication, cognition and ADL applications.   providing the learner from all practice points with tools to rehabilitate clients regardless of equipment and technological availability.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Identify physiologic changes that occur in many individuals months and years post CVA, brain injury, and with PD.
  2. Apply recent evidence in motor learning and motivation to maximize the recovery for clients in chronic stroke rehabilitation.
  3. Apply recent evidence in practice structure and feedback to maximize the recovery for clients after brain lesion/injury.
  4. Debunk rehabilitation myths about recovery dependence on timing and technology in effective rehabilitative outcomes in those with brain injury, degenerative disease, or stroke.
KEYWORDS: stroke, degenerative disease, brain injury, neuroplasticity, motivation.
Session Outline: 

  • Introduction to the physiologic and morphologic changes in chronic stroke recovery, degenerative disease, and brain injury
  • Evidence in chronic stroke rehabilitation to date: successes, limitations and opportunities
  • Novel clinical application in chronic post stroke recovery: motivational and exercise attributes
  • Novel clinical application in chronic post stroke recovery: practice structure and feedback attributes
  • Case studies in chronic stroke, PD, MS, TBI recovery. Videotape application for use all points in the continuum of care
  • Questions and summary

 

 

 

 

 

II. TITLE: Overcoming the Invisibles: Chronic pain, functional movement disorders (FMD), post concussive (PCS), persistent postural perceptual (PPPD) and more!
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Do you feel confident that you are doing everything you can for persons with complicated cases such as chronic pain, functional neurologic, post concussive, cognitive/behavioral overlay, or anxiety influences? Could it be that these syndromes and disorders are connected through the pathophysiology in the brain? If you are not at all or are only distantly familiar with Post Concussive Syndrome (PCS), Persistent Postural Perceptual Disorder (PPPD); Functional Neurologic Disorder (FND) (aka Functional Movement Disorder (FMD) – this course is for you. If you are additionally wondering if these conditions as well as some of the other “invisible” conditions, including chronic pain syndromes, are somehow related – you would be correct to suspect and learn more about how. Be prepared for an enlightening application from Dr. Mike Studer that delves into the neurophysiology and more importantly APPLICATIONS for all of these conditions. 
Objectives: By the end of this course, attendees will:

1. Have a working knowledge enough to define, identify and examine: PPPD, FMD, chronic pain, and PCS

2.  Have a working knowledge enough to state evidence-based interventions for: PPPD and FMD.

3. Have a working knowledge enough to state evidence-based interventions for: chronic pain and post concussive syndromes (PCS).

 

 

KEYWORDS: Motor learning, dual task, attention, distraction, rehabilitation, concussion, skill, pain, chronic
Session Outline: 7 CEU

  • 8:00-8:45 An introduction to “the invisibles”: history of nomenclature and discoveries
  • 8:45-11:00 (break 9:30 x 15) The physiologies of PPPD, FMD/FND, PCS and Chronic pain
  • 11:00-12:00  The connections between these (and other) disorders
  • 1:00-2:30 Practical applications for each of the invisibiles and the commonalities across approaches
  • 2:30-2:45 Break
  • 2:45-4:00 Case studies in PPPD, FND, PCS, chronic pain
  • 4:00-4:30 Questions, summaries, and the future

 

 

III. TITLE: Parkinson’s Disease and the Parkinsonisms: Differentiating the diagnoses, prognoses, and treatments
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced and can be presented for PT, OT, SLP on request
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Parkinson’s Disease is NOT the same as Parkinsonism. From the cellular mechanism or pathophysiology – to the presentation, prognosis, and treatment. This course will clarify the clinical subtypes of Parkinsonisms – from vascular to inherited and inclusive of the three Multiple Systems Atrophies – expect a comprehensive coverage. How to treat, when to treat (timing) and what to expect are questions that will be answered in this course – based on today’s evidence. We will review the phenotypes of Parkinson’s Disease and clarify the suggest a classification paradigm for patients with primary tremor and rigidity; those with primary dyskinesia; freezing of gait; posture; and festination. We will provide videotape and case study application across 4 different classifications of Parkinson’s Disease and reveal applicable treatment strategies within each.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Identify relevant physiologic differences between Parkinsonisms and PD.
  2. Apply recent evidence in clinical interventions to each of the classifications or presentations of PD and Parkinsonisms.
  3. Identify the best clinical measures for each of the functional limitations and subtypes of PD and Parkinsonisms.
  4. Create proper expectations of outcomes and patient education based on diagnosis and presentation.  
KEYWORDS: dual task, attention, cognition, balance.
Session Outline: 

  • Introduction, outline, objectives, disclaimers
  • Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease and the variant Parkinsonism subtypes.
  • Current evidence for treatment within each impairment and functional limitation
  • Translating the evidence with practical intervention strategies across the subtypes
  • Case studies

 

 

 

IV. TITLE: The Omnipresence of Fear: Recognition through recovery
Participant Level: Intermediate to advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Fear leads to central neurologic impairments in awareness and attention on affected body parts, just like pain. Fear commonly leads to avoidant behavior in well-learned activities and may result in changes across resources of strength, ROM, sensation. As such, fear is well established as a reason not to move. However, fear also impacts how we move (symmetry, speed, compensations), offering opportunities for intervention. Changes due to fear include: reduced step length, foot clearance, and gait speed for persons with fear of falling; urgency in those with incontinence; limited head motion for those with fear of dizziness; and more. Functionally, we see the consequence of reduced participation (movement, social, vocational) as an unfortunate and unnecessary commonality of all. This session will help therapists reduce the losses from inactivity, interrupt the vicious cycle of maladaptive neuroplasticity (sensory, motor, psychological) that lead to altered motor control, and reduce the disability across multiple populations that emanates from fear.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Describe the interview, measurement and educational tools required to both objectify and personalize management of fear in mobility.
  2. Explain the relationship of fear on four distinct expressions in movement
  3. Describe the application of three evidence-based applications proven to reduce fear of movement.
  4. Describe the differences by definition and application, between anxiety and fear, for the optimal rehabilitative care of our patients.
KEYWORDS: stroke, neuroplasticity, motivation.
Session Outline: 

  • Introduction, learning objectives, disclosures, timeline
  • Defining Fear – and Contrasting it with Anxiety. Clinically relevant neurophysiology that leads to central adaptations and compensations.Consequences and expressions of fear. In this chapter, attendees will be introduced to the commonalities and many faces of fear. These include elevated pain, involuntary movements, elevated tone, altered biomechanics, anxiety, errors in performance (yips, twisties, cognitive errors, word-finding difficulties) and avoidant behavior.The Foundations of Treating Fear. In this chapter, we will deliver evidence-based clinical approaches to reduce nociplasticity, all forms of maladaptive neuroplasticity, altered motor control, elevated sensory receptors, and the autonomic nervous system.

    Preventing Fear Avoidant Behavior. In this chapter, we will cover how to treat fear inhibitive behavior across the lifespan and range of diagnoses in neurology, pelvic health, orthopedics, and sport

    Returning to Wellness – and Staying There. In this chapter, we will discuss how to help fearful patients succeed after therapy has completed. Staying well and beating the next trauma. The reward cycle wins!

    Summary, Knowledge Translation and Resources

  • Questions and summary

This course is intended for a primary PT audience, yet can be adjusted to be relevant and appealing to SLP and OT.  This course is intended for neuro, geriatric, ortho, pelvic, and pediatric populations

 

 

 

 

 

 

V. TITLE: Somatosensory Reweighting: Forcing reorganization in the impaired or compensating nervous system
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced. This course will have a focus on balance, UE recovery, gait, and ADLs and can be presented for PT only, or PT and OT alike.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This program will enlighten attendees to frequently unrecognized opportunities in balance retraining for patients with impaired balance. The focus will be placed on rehabilitation of patients with sensory impairment: neuropathy, vestibulopathy, spinal cord lesion (MS, SCI), and cortical lesions (stroke, MS, tumor). This program will additionally cover recent technological advances that will allow us to better detect, classify, treat and analyze rehabilitative gains in various forms of balance impairment.  Dr. Studer will provide direct clinical applications will include improved testing and rehabilitation individuals with nonspecific visual dependence.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Reliably test and identify patients with abnormal or pathologic visual dependence in balance.
  2. Critically appraise balance measures for their ability to determine sensory contributions to the examination.
  3. Identify and be ready to apply treatment options to reduce abnormal sensory dependence in balance for multiple conditions.
  4. Translate the recovery of somatosensory function into quality of life improvements for clients with neurologic impairment, as seen in the ICF and quality of life indices.
  5. Identify new technologies for diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in the arena of reweighting.
KEYWORDS: Sensory reweighting, Balance, Neuroplasticity.

 

 

VI. TITLE: Neurologic and Geriatric Rehabilitation: Maximizing outcomes in those with impairment in cognition and motivation
 Participant Level: Intermediate to advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This presentation will include practical clinical applications for the physical and occupational therapist to best rehabilitate patients with cognitive impairment from stroke, brain injury and other neurological impairment. Dr. Studer will help participants to accurately recognize the common cognitive impairments, individualize their care (exam and treatment), and set appropriate goals. We will reveal how to systematically evaluate and prescribe an individualized program for each of the cognitive impairments addressed: awareness, attention, memory and perceptual impairment (including neglect).  Additionally, this course will reveal some of the latest developments in motivational and other psychological considerations for therapists.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Be aware of recent evidence-based advances in cognitive rehabilitation, recovery of self efficacy, motivation, and the psychological variables in rehabilitation.
  2. Recognize clinical applications, functionally-relevant documentation, and measurement applications in awareness, attention, dual-task, and problem solving.
  3. Describe available resources in psychology and executive function for clinical use in rehabilitation.
  4. Describe modalities for and interventions designed for optimal motivation, autonomy, competence, and self efficacy.

 

KEYWORDS: Motivation, depression, pessimism, self efficacy, attention
Session Outline: 

  • Introduction, outline, goals
  • Defining cognitive impairments, motivation, depression and associated concepts as related to rehabilitation
  • Promoting recovery of cognition through neuroplasticity and recovery: Awareness, Attention, and problem-solving
  • Recent advances in research and evidence based practice:  the psychology of rehabilitation
  • Interventions in motivation
  • Interventions in cognition: attention, awareness
  • Interventions in self efficacy, autonomy and motor control
  • Incorporating research and technological advances: cognition, self efficacy, and depression
  • Case studies and applications by video
  • Summary and discussion, questions

This course is intended for PT, OT, and SLP

 

VII. TITLE: The Science of Balance
Participant Level: Intermediate
COURSE DESCRIPTION: What is the difference between screening and testing? What is the science of imbalance? What are the differences between unsteadiness, imbalance, dizziness, lightheadedness and vertigo? How do I document to prove my worth, my role, or this patient’s potential? What is the evidence for helping someone improve balance? What is the best method to select the most sensitive and responsive balance test for each patient? What cognitive behavioral and psychological influences could be involved with this person? Dr. Mike Studer will provide the answers to these questions and more are in this seminar intended for advanced dizziness management- differential diagnostics and treatment understanding mechanisms of imbalance and ultimately fall risk beyond the vestibular system. Expect practical techniques, readily applied to the clinic, incorporating current evidence and revealing future advances in balance and fall prevention.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Identify fall-risk screening tools known to improve examination selection and probability of fall risk.
  2. Select and conduct appropriate tests in an effort to identify patient skill in function, sensori-motor capacities, and impairments.
  3. Select and conduct measures, gather data, and design of an individualized treatment plan to reduce fall risk
  4. Apply an individualized intervention strategy to reduce fall risk for older adults and monitor response to treatment interventions with objective measures.
KEYWORDS: Balance, Falls, Wellness, Fall prevention
Session Outline: *NOTE THIS COURSE IS AVAILABLE AS A ONE-DAY OR A TWO-DAY PRESENTATION

  • Define fall risk and balance
  • The physiology of balance and pathophysiologies leading to imbalance
  • Defining and identifying evidence-based screening
  • The science and quantification of balance: assessment measures
  • Interventions in balance and fall prevention: Rehabilitative and Restorative: Reducing pain, dizziness, vertigo, improvments in motor learning, fitness and reconditioning, cognitive remediateion, and more
  • Interventions in balance and fall prevention: Compensatory
  • Documentation in a manner that will demonstrate skilled therapy and justify reimbursement for fall prevention and imbalance
  • Applications in fall prevention: Case Studies
  • The future of treatment: Technological advances in gait analysis and fall prevention
  • Questions and summative comments

This course is intended for PT and OT alike.

 

VIII. TITLE: Maximizing Motor Learning: Neurology, Geriatrics, Orthopedics – the course that your patients cannot afford for you to miss!

 

Participant Level: Intermediate
COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this full-day course, Dr. Studer will not only explore but also CLINICALLY APPLY the latest evidence in motor learning as related to feedback, motivation, attention, task development, practice and intensity. Regardless of your profession: PT, OT or SLP. Regardless of your subspecialty: Neurology, Geriatrics, Sports or Orthopedics – please come prepared by completing the 1 page reading and bring your “A” game. We are going to challenge and potentially overhaul your pre-conceived notions of how to maximize motor learning. You can expect to walk away with practical techniques applying to your patient engagement AND the full understanding of how to optimize motor learning for every person on your caseload. Do you KNOW how to create THE most active, engaged, attentive and informed learner in each person you touch? If not, why not?
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Optimize learning using evidence-based principles of motor learning, attention, and motivation.
  2. Name the three main principles used in OPTIMAL
  3. Identify two practical clinical applications for each of the three principles of OPTIMAL
  4. Create an individualized and meaningful learning environment for each person.
KEYWORDS: Motor learning, OPTIMAL, attention, intrinsic motivation
Session Outline: 

  • Evidence-based learning for normal and impaired subjects/patients
  • Enhanced Expectancies: Creating an environment of success and priming.
  • Autonomous Support: Facilitating and maximizing attention, confidence and interest
  • External Feedback: Improving the permanence of learning through goal-directed behavior
  • Documentation in a manner that will demonstrate skilled therapy and justify reimbursement for fall prevention and imbalance
  • Case Studies
  • The future of treatment: OPTIMAL-based learning advances in the clinic
  • Questions and summative comments

This course can be tailored to PT; PT/OT; or PT/OT/SLP with prior notice

 

 

IX. TITLE: The Skill That Connects Us: PT, OT, SLP: The Latest and Future of Dual Task Testing and Training
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Why are some movements “automatic”, processed without direct and consistent conscious control, or even resistant to environmental distractions? How do movements become automatic in the unimpaired learner and begin again in those with brain injury or other impairment? In this full-day course, we will review, APPLY, and ADVANCE the science of procedural learning (regaining automatic function) in gait, speech, ADL, athletics and more! Dr. Studer will review how the best applications of dual task facilitate the transfer of experiences into procedural memories. Additionally, attendees will get a sneak peek into the emerging world of Dual Task Fitness, for the benefit of fall prevention, ADL, speech for those with fall risk, MCI, concussion, some PD, MS, ALS, and stroke.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Identify the 4 main modalities of distractions in clinical and real world DT applications.
  2. Name the three guiding principles of DT training
  3. Identify the physiology of attention and DT in normal, rehabilitative, and impaired conditions.
  4. Identify compensatory strategies for those unable to improve DT
  5. Create an individualized program for patients in accordance with your scope of practice.

 

KEYWORDS: Motor learning, dual task, attention, distraction, rehabilitation
Session Outline: *NOTE THIS COURSE IS AVAILABLE AS A ONE-DAY OR A TWO-DAY with second day material built on Dual Task Fitness™ and Dual Task HIIT™; an objective high-intensity gaming platform for the individualized prescription of dual task rehabilitation and wellness.

 

  • The physiology of attention and learning, including pathophysiologies of: AD, MCI, PD, stroke, concussion, and TBI
  • Evidence-based learning for normal and impaired subjects/patients
  • The relevance of dual task tolerance: fall risk, ADL automaticity, attention reserve.
  • The physiology of dual task tolerance in the brain
  • Dual task testing across each of the professions
  • Dual task training across each of the professions
  • Measurement and documentation for skilled therapy in PT, OT, or SLP
  • Applications in: communication, ADL, mobility, fall prevention and automaticity
  • The future of treatment: Technological advances in gait analysis and fall prevention
  • Questions and summative comments

This course can be tailored to PT; PT/OT; or PT/OT/SLP with prior notice

 

X. TITLE: GeriATHletics: How to support and maximize the performance of aging athletes

 

Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will debunk some of the myths of aging and conditioning. Dr. Studer will describe the emerging trend of endurance and individual sport performance in aging through evidence-based recommendations in biomechanics, training, recovery, nutrition, and competition.  Learn how to begin to test, train and develop active GeriAthletes in endurance sports (running, triathlon, swimming), team sports, and individual sports.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Through attendance of this course, participants will:

1) Understand and apply the latest evidence in exercise: endurance, strength, power; specific to those 55

and over
2) Possess the ability to perform performance-based assessments through observation, standardized

testing and instrumentation
3) Develop an individualized training program for a competitive geriATHlete in various competitive and

recreational sports and activities.

KEYWORDS: GeriATHlete, endurance, aging, athletics, physiology, motivation
Session Outline:  (Ideally 2 hours)

  • Introduction, outline, goals
  • The GeriATHlete defined. The epitome of healthy aging
  • Strengthening for competitive performance over 55
  • Endurance training for competitive performance over 55
  • Considerations of injury prevention: geriatric-specific modifications
  • Sport specific training and competing: Goal setting, psychology
  • Case Studies and discussion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XI. TITLE: Return to Sport: Dual Task Testing and Training for the injured athlete recovery and management.
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: At the highest level, athletes have stored procedural memories, ready to use in their sport. They can adjust these movements in the context of the game with consideration of fatigue, situation, environmental conditions, and opponent. Procedural memories are automatic in nature, and are processed without direct and consistent conscious control. In the most skilled athletes, these movements are resistant to environmental distractions (crowd, opponent taunting, pain)? After a concussion, when is an injured athlete truly safe enough to return, to wield their fully automatized skill in the face of both internal and external distractions? In this course, Dr. Studer will review, APPLY, and ADVANCE the science of procedural learning (regaining automatic function) in sport – revealing applications and insights as to how coaches and healthcare professionals can use dual task testing and training to decide when recovery is feasible AND facilitate recovery of the same. Attendees will get a sneak peek into the emerging world of Dual Task Fitness training – a technology serving as a preventative and rehabilitative application.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Identify the 4 main modalities of distractions in clinical and real world DT applications.
  2. Name the three guiding principles of DT training
  3. Identify the physiology of attention and DT in normal and impaired conditions.
  4. Identify technologies available now to improve DT
  5. Create an individualized program for patients in accordance with your scope of practice.

 

KEYWORDS: Motor learning, dual task, attention, distraction, rehabilitation, concussion, skill
Session Outline: (Ideally 2 hours)

  • The physiology of attention and learning,
  • Evidence-based learning for normal and injured athletes
  • The relevance of dual task tolerance in sport
  • The physiology of dual task tolerance in the brain
  • Dual task testing
  • Dual task training
  • Measurement and documentation of dual task cost
  • Applications in sport automaticity and return to sport determination
  • The future of treatment: technological advances
  • Questions and summative comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XII. TITLE: Parkinson Disease: One size DOES NOT fit all. Differential diagnostics and treatment strategies and examinations specific to subtype.
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced. This course can be presented for PT, or PT, OT, SLP
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Physical Therapy treatment for Parkinson’s Disease is often oversimplified and defined as by one or two global approaches. This course will further the discussion of the various subtypes of Parkinson’s Disease and begin to ascribe treatment strategies specific to each. We will address the primary symptoms in PD and suggest a classification paradigm for patients with primary tremor and rigidity; those with primary dyskinesia; freezing of gait; posture; and festination. Clinicians in the audience will be invited to use the paradigm to further the discussion of subtyping PD and researching within these categories. We will provide videotape and case study application across 3 different classifications of Parkinson’s Disease and reveal applicable treatment strategies within each.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES:  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  1. Identify relevant physiologic changes that occur in PD and the evidence on objective testing of each impairment
  2. Apply recent evidence in clinical interventions to each of the classifications or presentations of PD.
  3. Identify the best clinical measures for each of the functional limitations and subtypes of PD.
  4. Stimulate research furthering the classification of PD subtypes, and treatment approaches therein.
KEYWORDS: dual task, attention, cognition, balance
Session Outline: 

  • Introduction, outline, objectives, disclaimers
  • Pathophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease and the variant subtypes.
  • Current evidence for treatment within each impairment and functional limitation
  • Translating the evidence with practical intervention strategies across the subtypes
  • Case studies
  • Questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XIII. TITLE: Maximizing patient engagement and potential in each PERSON you guide
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course is comprised of the latest in rehabilitation techniques focused on fostering patient’s self efficacy, autonomy, natural human motivation, adaptability, resilience, and independence. Dr. Studer pulls from the latest in psychology, motor learning, neuroplasticity – incorporating all of these evidence-based sciences with the soft skills and application of each in a practical course for all participants. Help all of your patients achieve their full potential, regardless of the condition. This course is for you if you are working in outpatient, HH, or SNF, where patients can make a choice about attending, or refusing a therapy visit. Mike will address patient engagement from the perspectives of motor learning, behavioral economics, psychology, from the perspective of a 30 year veteran therapist – that has never stopped learning and innovating. No matter the diagnoses of the patients that you are seeing – be ready for practical applications from a therapist whose cancellation rate in the last 5 years running has reduced from 2.58% to 1.46%, real numbers.
Objectives: By the end of this course, attendees will:

1.     Identify 3 barriers to behavioral change (adopting recommendations) that are commonly seen in healthcare settings.

2.     Identify 3 applications for behavioral economics in the clinical, rehabilitative, or wellness settings.

3.     Identify 5 common concepts in behavioral economics that apply to healthcare.

4.     Describe how to apply 3 behavioral economic concepts in their own healthcare interactions.

KEYWORDS: Behavioral economics, nudge, loss aversion, gamification, confirmation bias
Session Outline: 4 CEU

8:00-8:30 Move over motivational interviewing and active listening…

8:30-9:15 Welcome to Behavioral Economics: More familiar than you think

9:15-10:00  Behavioral Economics in Healthcare: Understanding choice and bias

10:00-10:15 Break

10:15-11:00 Creating Reward Through Gamification and Loss Aversion in Health Care: You win again!

11:00-11:45 Helping Patients Choose Best: Nudge and Choice Architecture Applied

11:45-12:15 Questions, summaries, and the future

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XIV. TITLE: Maximizing Recovery in the Upper Extremity: The applications course
Participant Level: Intermediate to Advanced
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Join Dr. Mike Studer, PT, DPT, MHS, NCS, FAPTA in debunking the mysterious and all-too elusive efforts to stimulate, encourage, trick and FORCE the UE to recover function with emphasis in order as listed: stroke, PD,CP, hemispherectomy, MS, and more.. Expect practical applications for your patients, now!.
Objectives: By the end of this course, attendees will:

1.     Understand and apply the prognostic indicators of UE recovery post stroke.

2.     Identify and contrast evidence-based recovery strategies for the UE in PD and stroke.

3.     Identify best-practice exams and emerging trends in objective measures for UE function and impairment for CP, stroke, PD, and MS.  

4.     Identify strategies to promote sensory recovery in the UE post stroke.

 

 

KEYWORDS: Motor learning, upper extremity, neuroplasticity, constraint, forced use, intensity
Session Outline: 7 CEU

  • 8:00-8:45  UE
  • 8:45-11:00 (break 9:30 x 15) The physiologies of PPPD, FMD/FND, PCS and Chronic pain
  • 11:00-12:00  The connections between these (and other) disorders
  • 1:00-2:30 Practical applications for each of the invisibiles and the commonalities across approaches
  • 2:30-2:45 Break
  • 2:45-4:00 Case studies in PPPD, FND, PCS, chronic pain
  • 4:00-4:30 Questions, summaries, and the future

 

 

 

Mike Studer, PT, DPT, MHS, NCS, CEEAA, CWT, CSST, BFPCE, FAPTA

mike@mikestuder.com

www.mikestuder.com